Antique dresses and flowers, a match made in heaven.

Ah, antique dresses and flowers. A match made in heaven. There are some really lovely antique pieces in the shop right now, and we really feel that nothing brings an antique dress to life more than flowers. With spring and summer coming, that means that flower picking, wedding, and all things flower season are coming up. So, we paired together five dresses from our shop and some flower arrangements from florists we adore.

Our Hearken to Elegance Gown, in its rich, burgundy looks perfect with this moody, sculptural flower arrangement from Putnam & Putnam. We love how the color of this dress looks with these deep purples and hints of yellow.

The sweet Gentle Motion Dress  is made of the softest pink and softest silk. They’re actually separates, so the top can be worn separately from the bottom. We thought the sweetness of this pair looked perfect with this ruffly cream and pink RUE ANAFEL arrangement. It has a bit of whimsy, like it was plucked straight from an english garden.

Our Modern Enchantments Dress is an Edwardian lawn dress. Its soft cotton is perfect for wearing on a warm day either lounging around the house or taking walks through nature. We paired it with this Sarah Winward arrangement, a bit wild and unruly which looks like it was foraged from a meadow in the mountains.

Our romantic Bronte Parsonage Dress is made of beautiful antique lace. This would be a perfect wedding dress, so refined with its high neckline and fitted waist. We paired it with this arrangement by Amy Merrick. The pair both look straight out of a classic painting of a girl with flowers.

We imagine a girl who lives in the country and love going on walks along the stream owning our Gossamer Whisper Dress. Her perfect day would be clipping flora sand foliage from around her home all day to come home right as the sun sets and place them in an antique vase she found at a local antique shop. We paired this dress with an arrangement from Foxglove Botanicals, because its the exact arrangement we’d imagine her making.

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The Language of Flowers | Guest Post from RUE ANAFEL

Hello AV ladies! Saria from RUE ANAFEL here making a Valentine’s Day guest post. I have to be honest, in my adolescent years I disliked Valentine’s Day. The rebellious side of thought, “A consumer holiday created by Hallmark exploiting people to make a buck off the idea of romance.” But you know, Valentine’s Day has become one of my favorite holidays now. And really only because of flowers.

Valentine’s Day to me now isn’t about romance or consumerism, it’s about flowers. It’s the only day in the year (in the States, at least) when you step out, you see people carrying flowers, be it in their arms walking down the street, in their backpack riding their bicycle, or sitting on their car dash board. I mean, I wish every day or at least week were more filled with people bringing flowers home, but hey, at least there’s one day out of the year.

I feel like flowers have been somewhat forgotten in American culture. When I was in Europe, everyone had flowers in their home. Looking around the streets of Holland, so many people are riding their bicycles with flowers. In the 19th century, flowers played such a crucial role in culture, that they were even used as a type of language. People would use flower bouquets to send coded messages that were not allowed to be spoken aloud in Victorian society.

If you plan to buy some flowers this year for yourself or a partner and want to send a coded message, here’s a mini reference guide of 6 flowers and their meanings:

Lilac –

“First emotions of love. Oh, Lilac.” The sweet smell of early spring and sign of hope for warmer months to come, just the same as feelings of a newfound sprouting love.

Iris –

“I have a message for you.” An iris starts off closed and, what seems like overnight, falls open like a book. An air of mystery soon followed by exposing one’s intimate inside.

Bachelor Buttons, also known as Cornflower –

“Delicacy, Purity of Feelings, and Good Fortune.” Some of my favorite summer memories involve bachelor buttons.I see myself with my eyes squinting from the brightness of the summer sun then looking over at my partner in the driver seat. Riding down country roads and seeing blue speckles scattered about the side of the highway, along wood and wire fences containing horses and cows. It’s was a moment of presence for me, of pure happiness and joy.

Larkspur –

“Lightness and Desire for Laughter.” Larkspur is the ultimate garden meadow flower to me. I imagine them perfectly situation in the most perfect meadow style English garden. They bloom in the spring and summer, a time filled with laughter and feeling light hearted.

Pink Rose –

“Admiration.” Oh, a pink garden rose. Like the ethereal princess of all the flowers. So lovely and ethereal in every sense of the words.

White Camellia –

“Faithfulness and Longevity.” Also one of the first spring bloomers, when I see camellia blooming I know spring has come. Year after year, at the end of winter I always keep my eye out for camellia, for the coming of spring.

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Monday Muse | Women in Art, Part Deux

It’s been a long time since we’ve done a Monday Muse post! (We’ll pick up on this, I promise!) and so I thought of doing a Part Deux of Women in Art. I have 4 different types of painting subjects I love. Flowers, Interiors, Landscapes, and Women. Not necessarily in that order. But flowers and women are pretty high up there…and when the two are combined, my eyes literally get hearts in them. Or any combo of the 4 = hearts in eyes + unicorn emoji.

Monday Muse / Women in Art / Part Deux
Portrait of a Lady with a Cat and Ivy – Juan Cordero 19th century

Monday Muse / Women in Art / Part Deux
James Longacre Wood (American painter, 1863-1938) Flower Girl 1899

Monday Muse / Women in Art / Part Deux
Seated Girl by Hugh Ramsay, c. 1894-1906

Mason, Arnold; Portrait of a Young Woman; Derby Museums Trust; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/portrait-of-a-young-woman-60969

Mason, Arnold, 1885-1963; Portrait of a Young Woman

Monday Muse / Women in Art / Part Deux

Sir William Orpen:  The Eastern Gown 1878 – 1931

image credits: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10

I identify with each one of these women in different ways. These women were painted at a time when women really didn’t have a voice or platform. It wasn’t that long ago that women were still considered property and their place was at home and in the kitchen. You either were married off or became a spinster (i.e. loser) We’ve come a long way from that. And sure, sure… there’s still more work to be done. But what our society has accomplished in less than 100 years is staggering compared to what was done for women’s rights in the preceding millenniums (i.e. pretty much ZILCH)

The women in these paintings represent a quiet and resolute strength while appearing gentle and feminine for the painter. She is both approachable and unassuming, but also a world of her own that she does not mind keeping you out of.

Monday Muse / Women in Art / Part DeuxOphelia. Oil on Canvas. 76 x 62 cm. English School.19th Century.

Monday Muse / Women in Art / Part Deux
The Journey Home ~ Henry John Yeend King ~ (English: 1855-1924)

Monday Muse / Women in Art / Part DeuxAnna Pavlova by Savely Sorine (1878 – 1953)

Monday Muse / Women in Art / Part Deux

Monday Muse / Women in Art / Part Deux

I just discovered Gerald Brockhurst (who painted the portrait above) and I am in LOVE. Not only do I really enjoy his style of painting, his subjects always have the best outfits! I am inspired not once, but twice! I’ll have to do a post on just his portraits from the 1930s and 1940s because the clothes are pretty exquisite!

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Palette de Couleur | Harvest Hues

We’re jumping for joy that its autumn again, because that means that some of our favorite colors are back in season. With the weather getting colder, we find ourselves leaning towards warming colors. We’ve been finding a lot of outfit ideas that include some colors we’re really loving right now on Pinterest and decided to put them all together to show you!

tumericsaffronmustard1. Turmeric: We are loving this color so much and noticed it’s been popping up everywhere on the runways. It’s a lovely warm goldenrod, with the perfect undertone of a yellow brown.

2. Paprika: Close to burgundy, but a bit more brown-red, we love seeing this color paired with a mustard or saffron. It’s also close to another color we love, cinnamon, it’s so rich.

3. Saffron: We love this outfit so much. It’s the perfect fall attire, a sweater and longer length skirt in a warm, orangey autumn hue.

4. Mustard: A soft, dull mustard is a perfect addition of color. Although we’re not big fans of yellow, this shade is beautiful, especially with a beige or brown.

Sources: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

 

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Horror Scream Queens, pt. ii

Remember our post last October on Classic Horror Scream Queens? Well, rather than highlighting ladies from the 1900s-1950s, this year we decided to feature some Scream Queens from the 70s, 80s, and 90s. These dames are not only memorable for the roles they played, but we love all their outfits throughout these films as well. In no particular order, here they are!screamqueens3

It’s believed that Shelley Duvall’s time on the set of The Shining was what pushed her to be the recluse she’s said to be today. She had a taxing, challenging time as Wendy Torrance, as one can see through the behind-the-scenes video Stanley Kubrick’s daughter, Vivian, made for The Shining. Despite all that, Wendy Torrance’s outfits are some of my all-time favorites in horror films. I love the 70s inspired mountain look. Milena Canonero, the costume designer, lead an outstanding career dressing almost all Kubrick’s films, as well as later designing costumes for Wes Anderson films.

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Oh, Sissy Spacek, another strange actress from the 70s we admire. I remember first watching Carrie when I was eight years old. My cousins and I rented it from the local video store and all squished on the couch together. I honestly don’t remember much about the movie, but that it was probably far too violent for my parents to approve. Now when I watch Carrie, I notice the wardrobe. I love her mom’s nightgown and the simple silk gown she wears to prom.screamqueens2

And last, we have Sheryl Lee as the beloved Laura Palmer. Oh, Twin Peaks, the gem of Pacific Northwest. It has all the sweaters and plaid wool skirts a girl who loves autumn could ask for. Although Sheryl Lee doesn’t have too much screen time in the show, everyone knows her face. I’m eagerly waiting for the release for the new season! It couldn’t come soon enough.

Sources: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

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