Where I’m Coming From…

When I was nine I immigrated to America with my mother to a little town called Yorktown Heights in New York. I quickly adjusted to a new life in the suburbs learning all there was to know about what it meant to be American. (This meant Saturday morning cartoons, Sesame Street, sleepovers, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, pizzaaaaaa, and McDonalds)

I grew up in a family setting where you didn’t really ask questions. Now, we’re going to get a little PERSONAL up in here, ya ready? (you don’t have to keep reading, just look at the pretty pictures…)

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I have no relationship with my biological father. I’ve only met him twice that I can remember, and faint recollections as a child. To cut to the chase, my mother was, how shall we say…”the other woman” and my biological dad was already married with 4 kids of his own. Anyhow, all that stuff is fuzzy and like I said, in my family, we don’t prod and pry into business that’s not ours.

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Sooo… needless to say, I really had no connection to the Philippines when we left. I never really desired to know much about the country I spent most of my childhood in. I have wonderful memories from my childhood, but ask me about Philippine history or culture and you’ll be met with a blank stare.

So last night I was pondering around Pinterest as one does at 9 PM already tucked in bed. And I came across all these wonderful vintage photos of the Philippines from the late 19th century.

And amazingly enough a lot of the scenes depicted here I remember as  a child.

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Now, before you make the wrong assumption that I’m really a time traveler (because how else would pictures from the 1800s look like my childhood in the 80s?!) remember that I grew up “in the sticks” of the Visayan islands.

Seeing these vintage photos from the Philippines made me wonder about my Filipino ancestors. Where do I come from really? Where do I get certain quirks and traits from? Did I have an ancestor who loved to dance? Who loved preserving old things? Who loved things when they were pleasantly worn in?

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As I gaze at these women in the pictures with their dark hair and dark eyes I wonder if in someway we are related?

Unfortunately websites like ancestry.com do not help at all in researching these sort of things. As far as records of family in the Philippines, most of it was word of mouth. And again, if you come from a family that doesn’t talk much about things, our family history has faded away.

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As someone who deeply loves history and old objects and the stories behind them, this saddens me. I’ll never really know. I’ll never have answers. All I have is what I can imagine.

 

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Vintage Monday Muse | Women of Art

The largest inspirations for Adored Vintage shoots and Lookbooks come from old paintings and drawings of women. I can spend hours upon hours browsing through these old paintings. Not only were their lives and garments so romantic, they have such a special essence to the way they sit, stand, or just do things. I love how graceful and lovely they look even while sitting upon rocks, gathering hay, or tossing a salad. These are our ultimate style/hair/squad/life goals here at AV.

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“A Garden Party”, Gari Melchers

3bdb13155c80f52a3e7ea333b5705533Portrait of Madame F.”Edouard Dubufe

2f194409cfef924a0fd1394156d98184“Zwei Sitzende”Egon Schiele

8f4c68c4cde03840b07d5558aefe6db9“Portrait of Olga Konstantinovna Lancere”, Zinaida Serebriakova

877931d1a9cf3e37efa08d09689d2be2The Glen Walker Sisters”, John da Costa

98b68e8864e62d154341fed3ff5c53f6The Lady of the House”, William Henry Margetson

7103f9d7dbc2a814ad5dc9de145f26b7“Caprice”, Sir William Russell Flint

92769d08c5158c15c6cd72f3d0943ba0“The Sevres Vase”, James Jebusa Shannon

dfb62dee8f3f107f4ec73cdaa6b643d3“Reflections”, Ethel Porter Bailey

2ecd720be488654d0e436ad5e0e6c654“The Boulder”, Charles Courtney Curran

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Antique Embroidery & Sample Books

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I’ve been wanting to learn how to embroider for several months now and I remember before moving to Portland I had promised myself to make time to do all these things I’ve been wanting to do.

Like learn flower arranging (check), learn how to use a pottery wheel (working on this), and learn how to embroider (on it!)

Last week I went to Fabric Depot and picked up several embroidery threads based on a 1940s pressed flower art piece I have. I’ll have to post photos of my progress on my current vintage dress revitalization progress… but for now I wanted to share some really stunning antique and vintage embroidery samples that just have me swooning.

The art of embroidery I feel has long been forgotten by most women. I’ve always thought the idea of it was so romantic and pleasant. I think of being tucked away in a garden cottage with a hot cup of tea nearby and passing a rainy day away with my needle and thread.

Have you ever taken up embroidery? Do you think it’s really old fashioned?

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Detail Waistcoat embroidery, suit, 1774-1793, French, silk (source)

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Samples of stitches (source)

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Antique embroidery from 1797, isn’t this just so exquisite? I adore the colors. (source)

0f771a6672721fa4f9d7e7552586258e 81b029f41982dec75c7020a1f742876cThese two samples are just so amazing! I’ll have to give ribbon work a try eventually! I just think these would be so lovely embroidered along a vintage skirt hem, don’t you think? (source)

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Embroidery on a jacket from 1775-1780. Isn’t this just so simple and lovely? I love the touch of the sequins too. (source)

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I think my next project will be a monotone embroidery piece. I love how this looks. Would be terrific on a 1920s dress or an Edwardian dress that has a few spots that need to be disguised.

c93de3ef40897c03fb606ac67b0dabacOh my gosh, this is just so gorgeous! Look at the ribbon work, it looks like it’s liquid! (source)

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Antique tambour embroidery work on an 18th century satin waistcoat. (source)

 

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On the Set: The Dashwood Country Cottage

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Sense and Sensibility, the 1995 version directed by Ang Lee, is one of my favorites of all the Jane Austen movie adaptations. I just find it all so lovely to look at and the acting is superb and all the characters are likable in their own way. Even that super snotty Mrs. Ferrars!

I know I really quite like a movie when I like everyone in it. I mean honestly, this version is like the crème de la crème of British actors! Well, in my non-movie aficionado opinion. There’s Emma Thompson (adore her), Kate Winslet (before Titanic made her a household name), Alan Rickman (years before he would be Snape), Emma Jones (whom I adore in Bridget Jones’ Diary), and Hugh Grant… just to name a few. It’s also wonderful for me to see all the actors in this setting because I know them from so many other movies. Like Imelda Staunton who plays Dolores Umbridge in Harry Potter.

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My favorite scenes of course take place in the country cottage where the Dashwood’s must now go live. I ADORE this house. I want to LIVE here. Everything about it. I kept pausing the movie to screencap different scenes. I love how all the colors are muted and faded. But not in a shabby chic sort of way. I love the quaintness of it all, the smallness. Compared to the scenes of the larger estates, I much rather prefer the country settings.

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I love the mix of textiles and mostly the lack of color. As you probably have guessed, I love neutrals and soft hues. Their blue and white gingham couch in their living room I adore so much but doubt I could ever go that “country” in my own home. But if I had a room just like this one, then it wouldn’t look so country. I mean, American country, like “shabby chic” country which in my opinion when taken to a certain extent looks really terrible and gaudy.

I always find it funny when I see overly done country interiors. The whole point of country living is that everything is more simple. More sparse. And I think that’s why I adore the settings of Sense and Sensibility so much. It seems quite realistic. But, what do I know. I’m not an expert on period piece movies! Simply, a girl that loves pretty simple things.

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